Cookies are most commonly baked until crisp or just long enough that they remain soft, but some kinds of cookies are not baked at all. Cookies are made in a wide variety of styles, using an array of ingredients including sugars, spices, chocolate, butter, peanut butter, nuts, or dried fruits.
The softness of the cookie may depend on how long it is baked.

During the 17th and 18th centuries in Europe, baking was a carefully controlled profession, managed through a series of Guilds or professional associations. To become a baker, people had to complete years of an apprenticeship – working through the ranks of apprentice, journeyman, and finally master baker. By having guilds, authorities could easily regulate the amount and quality of goods baked. As technology improved during the Industrial Revolution in the 19th century, so did the ability of bakers to make a wide range of sweet and savory biscuits for commercial consumption.

List of cookies

Alfajor
Angel Wings (Chruściki)
Anisette
Animal cracker
Anzac biscuit
Berger cookie
Berner Haselnusslebkuchen
Biscotti
Biscuit rose de Reims
Black and white cookie
Blondie
Brownie
Butter cookie
Chocolate chip cookie
Chocolate-coated graham cracker
Chocolate-coated marshmallow treat
Congo bar
Digestive biscuit
Fat rascal
Fattigmann
Flies graveyard
Florentine biscuit
Fortune cookie

Fruit squares and bars (date, fig, lemon, raspberry, etc.)
Ginger snap
Gingerbread house
Gingerbread man
Graham cookie
Hamentashen
Jumble
Kifli
Kolach
Koulourakia
Krumkake
Linzer cookie
Macaroon
Mexican wedding cake
Meringue
Nice biscuit
Oatmeal
Pastelito
Peanut butter cookie
Pepparkakor
Pfeffernüsse
Pizzelle
Polvorón

Qurabiya
Rainbow cookie
Ranger Cookie
Riposteria
Rosette
Rum ball
Rusk
Russian tea cake
Rock cake
Sablé
Sandbakelse
Şekerpare
Shortbread
Snickerdoodle
Speculoos
Springerle
Spritzgebäck (Spritz)
Stroopwafel
Sugar cookie
Tea biscuit
Toruń gingerbread
Tuile
Wafer
Windmill cookie



Cookies