In Songs My Mother Taught Me, Brando claimed he met Marilyn Monroe at a party where she played piano, unnoticed by anybody else there, and they had an affair and maintained an intermittent relationship for many years, receiving a telephone call from her several days before she died. He also claimed numerous other romances, although he did not discuss his marriages, his wives, or his children in his autobiography. As a young man he was a family friend of Stella Adler’s, whose daughter Ellen was a roommate of novelist Paula Fox. For a while, Brando and Fox lived under one roof and became close. Brando may have been the father of Fox’s first child, daughter Linda Carroll who was born in 1944. Linda was given up for adoption and is the mother of Courtney Love. Fox never named the child’s father nor addressed the affair.

Brando married actress Anna Kashfi in 1957. Kashfi was born in Calcutta and moved to Wales from India in 1947. She is said to have been the daughter of a Welsh steel worker of Irish descent, William O’Callaghan, who had been superintendent on the Indian State railways. However, in her book, Brando for Breakfast, she claimed that she really is half Indian and that the press incorrectly thought that her stepfather, O’Callaghan, was her real father. She said her real father was Indian and that she was the result of an “unregistered alliance” between her parents. Brando and Kashfi had a son, Christian Brando, on May 11, 1958; they divorced in 1959.

Brando earned a “bad boy” reputation for his public outbursts and antics. According to Los Angeles magazine, “Brando was rock and roll before anybody knew what rock and roll was”.[72] His behavior during the filming of Mutiny on the Bounty (1962) seemed to bolster his reputation as a difficult star. He was blamed for a change in director and a runaway budget, though he disclaimed responsibility for either. On June 12, 1973, Brando broke paparazzo Ron Galella’s jaw. Galella had followed Brando, who was accompanied by talk show host Dick Cavett, after a taping of The Dick Cavett Show in New York City. He reportedly paid a $40,000 out-of-court settlement and suffered an infected hand as a result. Galella wore a football helmet the next time he photographed Brando at a gala benefiting the American Indians Development Association.

Filmography
YearTitleRoleDirector(s)Notes
1950The MenKenneth “Ken” Wilcheck/”Bud”Fred Zinnemann
1951A Streetcar Named DesireStanley KowalskiElia KazanNominated—Academy Award for Best Actor
Nominated—New York Film Critics Circle Award for Best Actor
1952Viva Zapata!Emiliano ZapataElia KazanBAFTA Award for Best Foreign Actor
Cannes Film Festival Award for Best Actor
Nominated—
Academy Award for Best Actor
1953Julius CaesarMark AntonyJoseph L. MankiewiczBAFTA Award for Best Foreign Actor
Nominated—
Academy Award for Best Actor
The Wild OneJohnny StrablerLászló Benedek
1954On the WaterfrontTerry MalloyElia KazanAcademy Award for Best Actor
BAFTA Award for Best Foreign Actor
Golden Globe Award for Best Actor – Motion Picture Drama
New York Film Critics Circle Award for Best Actor
Nominated—
Bambi Award for Best International Actor
DésiréeNapoleon BonaparteHenry Koster
1955Guys and DollsSky MastersonJoseph L. Mankiewicz
1956The Teahouse of the August MoonSakiniDaniel MannNominated—Golden Globe Award for Best Actor – Motion Picture Musical or Comedy
1957SayonaraMaj. Lloyd “Ace” Gruver, USAFJoshua LoganDavid di Donatello Award for Best Foreign Actor
Nominated—
Academy Award for Best Actor
Nominated—
Golden Globe Award for Best Actor – Motion Picture Drama
Nominated—
New York Film Critics Circle Award for Best Actor
1958The Young LionsLt. Christian DiestlEdward DmytrykLaurel Award for Top Male Dramatic Performance
Nominated—
BAFTA Award for Best Foreign Actor
1959The Fugitive KindValentine “Snakeskin” XavierSidney Lumet
1961One-Eyed JacksRioMarlon BrandoAlso director
1962Mutiny on the Bounty1st Lt. Fletcher ChristianLewis Milestone
1963The Ugly AmericanAmbassador Harrison Carter MacWhiteGeorge EnglundNominated—Golden Globe Award for Best Actor – Motion Picture Drama
1964Bedtime StoryFreddy BensonRalph Levy
1965MorituriRobert CrainBernhard Wicki
1966The ChaseSheriff CalderArthur Penn
The AppaloosaMatt FletcherSidney J. Furie
1967A Countess from Hong KongOgden MearsCharlie Chaplin
Reflections in a Golden EyeMaj. Weldon PendertonJohn Huston
1968CandyGrindlChristian Marquand
The Night of the Following DayChauffeurHubert Cornfield
1969Burn!Sir William WalkerGillo Pontecorvo
1970King: A Filmed Record… Montgomery to MemphisHimselfEly LandauDocumentary
1972The NightcomersPeter QuintMichael WinnerNominated—BAFTA Award for Best Actor in a Leading Role
The GodfatherDon Vito CorleoneFrancis Ford CoppolaAcademy Award for Best Actor (refused)
Golden Globe Award for Best Actor – Motion Picture Drama
Kansas City Film Critics Circle Award for Best Actor
Nominated—
BAFTA Award for Best Actor in a Leading Role
Nominated—
National Society of Film Critics Award for Best Actor
Nominated—
New York Film Critics Circle Award for Best Actor
Last Tango in ParisPaulBernardo BertolucciNational Society of Film Critics Award for Best Actor
New York Film Critics Circle Award for Best Actor
Nominated—
Academy Award for Best Actor
Nominated—
BAFTA Award for Best Actor in a Leading Role
1976The Missouri BreaksRobert E. Lee ClaytonArthur Penn
1978RaoniNarratorJean-Pierre Dutilleux
Luiz Carlos Saldanha
Documentary
SupermanJor-ElRichard Donner
1979Apocalypse NowColonel Walter E. KurtzFrancis Ford Coppola
1980The FormulaAdam Steiffel, Chairman Titan OilJohn G. AvildsenNominated—Golden Raspberry Award for Worst Supporting Actor
1989A Dry White SeasonIan McKenzieEuzhan PalcyTokyo International Film Festival Award for Best Actor
Nominated—Academy Award for Best Supporting Actor
Nominated—
BAFTA Award for Best Actor in a Supporting Role
Nominated—
Chicago Film Critics Association Award for Best Supporting Actor
Nominated—
Golden Globe Award for Best Supporting Actor – Motion Picture
Nominated—
New York Film Critics Circle Award for Best Supporting Actor
1990The FreshmanCarmine SabatiniAndrew Bergman
1992Christopher Columbus: The DiscoveryTomás de TorquemadaJohn GlenNominated—Golden Raspberry Award for Worst Supporting Actor
1994Don Juan DeMarcoDr. Jack MicklerJeremy Leven
1996The Island of Dr. MoreauDr. MoreauJohn FrankenheimerGolden Raspberry Award for Worst Supporting Actor
Nominated—
Golden Raspberry Award for Worst Screen Couple (with “that darn dwarf”)
1997The BraveMcCarthyJohnny Depp
1998Free MoneyWarden Sven “The Swede” SorensonYves Simoneau
2001Apocalypse Now ReduxColonel KurtzFrancis Ford Coppola
2001The ScoreMaxFrank Oz

Marlon Brando gallery

Marlon Brando

According to the Guinness Book of World Records, Brando was paid a record $3.7 million ($14 million in inflation-adjusted dollars) and 11.75% of the gross profits for 13 days work on Superman. He finished out the decade of the 1970s with his controversial performance as Colonel Kurtz in another Coppola film, Apocalypse Now, a box-office hit for which he was highly paid and which helped finance his career layoff during the 1980s.

Marlon Brando

Marlon Brando is a cultural icon whose popularity has endured for over six decades. His rise to national attention in the 1950s had a profound effect on American culture. According to film critic Pauline Kael, “Marlon Brando represented a reaction against the post-war mania for security. As a protagonist, the Brando of the early fifties had no code, only his instincts.

Encyclopedia Brittanica describes him as “the most celebrated of the method actors, and his slurred, mumbling delivery marked his rejection of classical dramatic training. His true and passionate performances proved him one of the greatest actors of his generation”. It also notes the apparent paradox of his talent: “he is regarded as the most influential actor of his generation, yet his open disdain for the acting profession… often manifested itself in the form of questionable choices and uninspired performances. Nevertheless, he remains a riveting screen presence with a vast emotional range and an endless array of compulsively watchable idiosyncrasies.”

marlon brando, last tango in paris, 1972

marlon brando, last tango in paris, 1972

young marlon brando smiling

young marlon brando smiling

marlon brandon the wild one

marlon brandon the wild one

Marlon Brando

Marlon Brando

Marlon Brando the wild one

Marlon Brando the wild one


Marlon Brando, Jr.

Marlon Brando, Jr.


Movies

Per decades

Awards

Oscars

2


Marlon Brando

Marlon Brando, Jr. (April 3, 1924 – July 1, 2004) was an actor, film director, and activist. He is credited with bringing a gripping realism to film acting, and is often cited as one of the greatest and most influential actors of all time.

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